European Commission Refuses To Condemn Spanish Violence In Catalonia

This morning (Oct 3rd) EU High Representative/Vice President Federica Mogherini and Commissioner Christos Stylianides addressed the European Parliament in Strasbourg on the recent attacks in Syria.

"The EU will work with the rest of the international community to guarantee that there will be no impunity for deliberate violations of International Humanitarian Law", they said.

However, such fine sentiments never found their way to the 900 or more victims of the barbaric behaviour of the Spanish security forces in Catalonia this weekend. In a statement issued the day after the events, the European Commission said, unbelievably, "this is an internal matter for Spain that has to be dealt with in line with the constitutional order."

The simple fact is that the Commission fears Catalonian independence. If it were to happen, Catalonia would leave the EU and would be obliged to apply for membership in its own right, as would have been the case with Scotland had that country voted for independence. The problem is that unanimity amongst member states is required in such a scenario, and Spain has vowed to veto any such application.

The loss of such an economically stable and high profile region would be a major setback for the EU, and would likely accelerate the fracturing of the union that many now accept as inevitable. It would also create border and customs issues that would dwarf the current uncertainties concerning the sensitive issue the post-Brexit Anglo-Irish border.

If the Spanish region of Catalonia breaks away from Spain in a so-called Catalexit, it would plunge the region into a long period of uncertainty and could end up having negative effects that "proportionally exceed" those of Brexit, according to the Dutch bank ING.

If the Spanish region of Catalonia breaks away from Spain in a so-called Catalexit, it would plunge the region into a long period of uncertainty and could end up having negative effects that "proportionally exceed" those of Brexit

Dutch Bank ING statement

The European Commission appears to believe that the shooting and beating of voters is an acceptable price to pay in order to keep EU citizens in line.

Follow EU Today on Social media:

Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright is publishing editor of EU Today. 

An experienced journalist and published author, he specialises in environment, energy, and defence.

He also has more than 10 years experience of working as a staff member in the EU institutions, working with political groups and MEPs in various policy areas.

Related posts