EU offends by referring to Gibraltar as a British "colony"

Following this week's decision in the European Parliament's Civil Liberties Committee, UK citizens should get visa-free access to the European Union even in the event of a no-deal Brexit. However, language used in the proposed EU regulation which described Gibraltar as a “colony” has offended many. 

The controversy highlights continued strains over the territory on Spain’s southern coast as Britain quits the Union and the remainder of the EU states swing the bloc’s policies behind Spain, which is taking advantage of Brexit to ramp up its spurious claim to “The Rock”

The new regulation would let British citizens can visit the EU without a visa for up to 90 days even if there is no special withdrawal deal. 

It made a new distinction between those living in Britain and those who are citizens of Gibraltar, a British Overseas Territory which is now in the EU. 

Diplomats said the British ambassador to the EU raised London’s objections to this in a meeting of EU envoys. A British spokeswoman said: “Gibraltar is not a colony and it is completely inappropriate to describe in this way.”

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Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright

Gary Cartwright is publishing editor of EU Today. 

An experienced journalist and published author, he specialises in environment, energy, and defence.

He also has more than 10 years experience of working as a staff member in the EU institutions, working with political groups and MEPs in various policy areas.

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